All About the DOG Sculpture Installation and Akane Takayama

Monday, 31 May 2010

Children's Sculpture On Line Exhibition 04


The children who have been participating in the workshops with the artist Akane Takayama have produced some outstanding work. "They ask intelligent questions, understand the process and enjoy the skills involved in three dimensional sculpture making. Some of these children are clearly very talented." the artist said.


This group photograph displays not only the variety of models the children conceived but also demonstrates their skills at building the forms and a talent in the use of colour. One of the important elements of the DOG Sculpture Installation was that the children create their own models. The artist wanted to deliver a social inclusion project which empowered the children to see their own potentials in public art rather than just use their skills to help create the artist's work.



When you consider the skills the children have employed it becomes more obvious how they actually benefit in a wider educational remit from these workshops. Children have to consider planning, construction methods, research of materials and tools needed and then employ skills in the manufacture of their model. The artist believes that all of these skills can lead into other lessons such as maths, English composition and science.



Whilst these three dimensional models are of a small scale and relatively thin in the body all of the skills needed to create these sculptures are scalable. That means that what the children have learnt in this scale can be used and transferred to larger scale models. More importantly they have been taught the process of planning and thought which goes behind the work of an artist and been given the opportunity to see themselves as artists in society.

You will be able to see some of these models on display at the Paradise Gardens installation of DOG on the 19th and 20th June 2010 in Victoria Park, London E3.

Children's Sculpture On Line Exhibition 03


The children who have been participating in the workshops with the artist Akane Takayama have produced some outstanding work. "They ask intelligent questions, understand the process and enjoy the skills involved in three dimensional sculpture making. Some of these children are clearly very talented." the artist said.

A small exhibition has been mounted in the Ideas Store in Bow displaying some of the sculptures produced by children from Tower Hamlets schools. The image above shows the display from one school.


You will be able to see some of these models on display at the Paradise Gardens installation of DOG on the 19th and 20th June 2010 in Victoria Park, London E3.



When you consider the skills the children have employed it becomes more obvious how they actually benefit in a wider educational remit from these workshops. Children have to consider planning, construction methods, research of materials and tools needed and then employ skills in the manufacture of their model. The artist believes that all of these skills can lead into other lessons such as maths, English composition and science.



This group photograph displays not only the variety of models the children conceived but also demonstrates their skills at building the forms and a talent in the use of colour. One of the important elements of the DOG Sculpture Installation was that the children create their own models. The artist wanted to deliver a social inclusion project which empowered the children to see their own potentials in public art rather than just use their skills to help create the artist's work.


Whilst these three dimensional models are of a small scale and relatively thin in the body all of the skills needed to create these sculptures are scalable. That means that what the children have learnt in this scale can be used and transferred to larger scale models. More importantly they have been taught the process of planning and thought which goes behind the work of an artist and been given the opportunity to see themselves as artists in society.

Children's Sculpture On Line Exhibition 02


The children who have been participating in the workshops with the artist Akane Takayama have produced some outstanding work. "They ask intelligent questions, understand the process and enjoy the skills involved in three dimensional sculpture making. Some of these children are clearly very talented." the artist said.

A small exhibition has been mounted in the Ideas Store in Bow displaying some of the sculptures produced by children from Tower Hamlets schools. The image above shows the display from one school.



You will be able to see some of these models on display at the Paradise Gardens installation of DOG on the 19th and 20th June 2010 in Victoria Park, London E3.


This group photograph displays not only the variety of models the children conceived but also demonstrates their skills at building the forms and a talent in the use of colour. One of the important elements of the DOG Sculpture Installation was that the children create their own models. The artist wanted to deliver a social inclusion project which empowered the children to see their own potentials in public art rather than just use their skills to help create the artist's work.


When you consider the skills the children have employed it becomes more obvious how they actually benefit in a wider educational remit from these workshops. Children have to consider planning, construction methods, research of materials and tools needed and then employ skills in the manufacture of their model. The artist believes that all of these skills can lead into other lessons such as maths, English composition and science.


Whilst these three dimensional models are of a small scale and relatively thin in the body all of the skills needed to create these sculptures are scalable. That means that what the children have learnt in this scale can be used and transferred to larger scale models. More importantly they have been taught the process of planning and thought which goes behind the work of an artist and been given the opportunity to see themselves as artists in society.

Children's Sculpture On Line Exhibition

The children who have been participating in the workshops with the artist Akane Takayama have produced some outstanding work. "They ask intelligent questions, understand the process and enjoy the skills involved in three dimensional sculpture making. Some of these children are clearly very talented." the artist said.

A small exhibition has been mounted in the Ideas Store in Bow displaying some of the sculptures produced by children from Tower Hamlets schools. The image above shows the display from one school.
This group photograph displays not only the variety of models the children conceived but also demonstrates their skills at building the forms and a talent in the use of colour. One of the important elements of the DOG Sculpture Installation was that the children create their own models. The artist wanted to deliver a social inclusion project which empowered the children to see their own potentials in public art rather than just use their skills to help create the artist's work.
When you consider the skills the children have employed it becomes more obvious how they actually benefit in a wider educational remit from these workshops. Children have to consider planning, construction methods, research of materials and tools needed and then employ skills in the manufacture of their model. The artist believes that all of these skills can lead into other lessons such as maths, English composition and science.

Models have come in all shapes and sizes and the way the three dimensional works have been created so that they "stand" gives a fascinating insight into the creative powers of these children. With the whale and the fish sculptures above fins and flukes have been used to "stand" the sculptures. An enterprising teacher should then be able to use these models as part of an explanation of evolution and how the first animals came out onto the land. The whale of course represents a return to the sea by animals whose flukes were originally legs.

As we can see in the sculptures of cats above, sometimes the effect appears humorous to the adult eye, however, this may not be the intention of the "artist". Yet we would have to be very dull indeed if we did not respond to the undeniable charm of some of these sculptures.



Whilst these three dimensional models are of a small scale and relatively thin in the body all of the skills neded to create these sculptures are scalable. That means that what the children have learnt in this scale can be used and transferred to larger scale models. More importantly they have been taught the process of planning and thought which goes behind the work of an artist and been given the opportunity to see themselves as artists in society.



You will be able to see some of these models on display at the Paradise Gardens installation of DOG on the 19th and 20th June 2010 in Victoria Park, London E3.


Sunday, 23 May 2010

Children's Exhibition at The Ideas Store in Bow



The Ideas Store Bow present Models from
the DOG Sculpture Workshops.

On Saturday 23.05.2010 the models from some of the schools in Tower Hamlets which have participated in the model making workshops went on public display. Akane Takayama installed and exhibition of models from Marion Richardson, Bonner and Hermitage schools in Tower Hamlets. Below are the images of the display.


Marion Richardson School went with a theme of birds in their model making class. As you can see not only did they produce creative work but the pupils learnt something of the principles of 3D model construction.

Hermitage School produced some very interesting material and special attention should be drawn to the four legged duck. As with the other schools the models are a definitive example of the imagination and ability of the children within these communities.


Bonner School children provided models that really were outstanding in terms of concept and design. The children found in the workshop not only a means to express themselves but also a forum for asking truly pertinent questions about art.

The pictures below show how the public exhibition within the Ideas Store has been presented.







Saturday, 15 May 2010

Exhibition of Childrens Models at the Idea Store

Date : 19th May to 25th May

Idea Store Bow
1 Gladstone Place
London
E3 5ES
Tel: 020 7364 5771/ 5776

There will be an exhibition of some of the childrens' models from the workshop element of this project at The Idea Store in Bow, East London. This is a major cultural resource in Tower Hamlets and provides a base from which learning and understanding can grow.

We are very grateful to The Ideas Store for providing space for an exhibition of the childrens models and hope that all who go to see them will enjoy the installation. Below is a video about The Ideas Store.

video


Go to Idea Store Web Site

Friday, 14 May 2010

The children say it all.

With the workshops now in full flow the results being produced are looking very interesting. The children are producing their own models and appear very happy with the artist's involvement with them. There is another side to the project which is the children's involvement with the actual installation.

At the back of the neck of the DOG sculptures there is a small "pocket" into which will go slips collected form the pupils. These slips contain a simple aspiration, the children's expression of a wish for the future. As we have been looking at these "messages" we have wondered what they say about us and our society.

Given the freedom to express themselves in this way we find that the messages are full of hope, full of expressions to create a better world and some are surprisingly perceptive about the issues our planet now faces. The possibility to make the world a better place appears as a core understanding that these 7 to 9 year old children have. One wonders what exactly happens to these insights and desires as they travel through the education system and take their place in the world of adults.

Somehow, we feel that these messages really demand to be heard so we will be publishing some of them here as the project continues. Obviously we are not correcting spelling as the meaning is always, mostly, clear.

"I wish that no-one was poor, and that there was no war."

"I wish that nobody had to live out side and they had there own homes"

"How I would like to change the world, is that if people would help the enviroment and save the animals from extinction. I say this is because we make pollution and that makes are animals in danger of extinction"

"I wish there was no poor or rich (we should be as one)"

"Do be honest"

"I wish the Govement stopped gangstas"

"I wish that the gun crimes stops"

"I wish monkeys stops eating bananas because they eat too much."

"Respect everyone and be equal even if you're black or white it doesn't matter just care for each other rich or poor and don't forget no more war and defeat together and no more pollution."

"I wish that whales and dolphins don't become rare in the future."

"I hope all babys who enter this world, enter this world with peace."

"more science"

"I wish no one is rude to each other."

Do respect property and do be gentle."

"Do good work because work is good."

"I wish that there were no bullies and no one got hurt."

"I wish for people stop killing and I wish for a dog and a cat."

"Stop poverty please."

"To have everyone treated equally eg: no poverty."

"I wish everyone in a safe position."

"I wish that the earth will never die."

"I wish there was no crime"

I wish tigers don't become extinct, and all the other big scary animals because some of the people are scared"

"I hope all crimes in the world stops"

"I would like the world to be helpful"

"Give the por [sic] people money and help them work and they will get money from work please and people that I know is por"

"I wish that Africa had more food."

"I wish that every country should have enough food, so we don't die!"

"I would like the world to be good"

"I would like the world to be friends"

"I wish I could fly to the earth"

"I will like people to be happy"

"I will like everyone to be good"

"I wish there was no wars"

Tuesday, 11 May 2010

Andy Kneebone, Hackney Events Manager



Andy Kneebone talks about the DOG Sculpture Installation and the role of the events team in providing great projects for the population of Hackney.

Childrens-Models



The workshops have begun and appear to be a great success with the children. The models they are producing are now gaining in number and some are truly impressive. Here is a small gallery of just a few of the examples.



Sunday, 2 May 2010

Workshops Commence

One of the elements of the DOG Sculpture Installation has been to include workshops for children in 19 primary schools local to the parks where the installation will be completed. The aim of these workshops is to provide an opportunity for the children to construct their own animal sculptures and learn about the process of model making.

Akane Takayama will be going into the schools to provide a structured delivery of model making which works from design to completion. Once the models have been completed they will be exhibited in the schools with a selection of the best then going into local libraries and other locations to provide the children with their own public art installations.

In addition, it is hoped to display some of the childrens work alongside the installation in the parks. We will be keeping you posted about the progress of the workshops as they develop.